Small businesses depend on a talented team. You, as the boss, are responsible for finding it, nurturing it and retaining it. However, the nurturing portion can sometimes become overlooked as you get busy with day-to-day tasks.

Each of your teachers are making sure to accomplish what they are responsible for: class, cleaning, checking people in and more. It can be easy for them to fall into the habit of simply getting these tasks done and heading home for the day. However, to grow as a business you have to grow as a team.

Enter the importance of team building. Those two words can be reminiscent of summer camp as a kid, and you might picture your staff making friendship bracelets or singing campfire songs together. But there is a bit more to team building than you might believe.

A recent Gallup poll studying the state of the American workplace found that close work friendships boost employee satisfaction by 50 percent, while people with a self-described best friend at work are seven times more likely to be fully engaged at work. The study also found engaged companies consistently outperform their competition when it comes to things like profits, productivity and turnover.

So while you may forego gathering your staff around a campfire or making friendship bracelets, it stands proven you need to be getting your team outside of the studio to bond.

Here are just a few examples of team building activities happening at companies across the country that you could incorporate at your studio:

Nerf Battle

Over at YouEarnedIt, they turn their office into a battleground as teams work together to avoid being shot down by a Nerf gun.

“For 30 minutes, the entire office became a battleground where strategy, collaboration and out-of-the-box thinking meant the difference between life and (virtual) death,” wrote Tim Ryan, an employee at YouEarnedIt, in a blog. “All of these employee-fueled initiatives lead to a company culture of camaraderie, trust, friendship and engagement.”

Culture Jam Sessions

The culture at your business is always fluctuating. This is why WorkStride created Culture Jam Sessions. It’s a time when the team gets together to reinforce a shared company culture.

“Our employees will get together in small groups to talk about what the culture is today, where we’d like it to be and how we got there,” said Meredith Mejia, the director of marketing at WorkStride. “The most important thing we do during this time is to record all the groups’ feedback and incorporate it into a culture guidebook, which is a living document that we refer to throughout the year.”

Circle of Appreciation

A circle of appreciation is something completely simple in concept and execution, with enormous impact. Engagement firm E Group kicked off their Culture Week activities by taking part in a circle of appreciation.

“The entire E Group staff formed a large circle, and each associate was asked to share something they appreciated about the person on their right,” said Rachel Niebling, the employee engagement specialist at E Group. “Once the circle was complete, the process was reversed and we all shared something we appreciated about the person on the left. Sounds simple, and it was. But it was also quite powerful. You could actually feel the energy shift as we moved around the circle. This activity really spotlighted the power of appreciation.”